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New Study Shows How Social TV Impacts Viewing Habits

New Study Shows How Social TV Impacts Viewing Habits

iModerate Author

Mar 22, 2012

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Denver, CO (March 22, 2012) – A new study from iModerate Research Technologies, a leading qualitative research firm, shows the tremendous impact Social TV, the act of connecting with people via social networks while watching television, has on our viewing. The hybrid, qualitative-quantitative study with males and females who engage in Social TV at least once a week uncovered that 58% of heavy engagers (more than 10 times a week) watch more live TV because they need to be part of the conversation in real-time. According to the study, Social TV has also made these viewers into more active consumers and influencers. To that end, a third of respondents said their primary reason for engaging in Social TV was either to give feedback to the television network or show support for their television program.

“Social TV is a huge phenomenon,” said Adam Rossow, VP of Marketing at iModerate. “The respondents in this study consistently remarked that it makes TV more fun. They love the social interaction and frequently add shows to their viewing lineup due to social chatter and the desire to keep up with the conversation. That adds up to more time spent on social networks and more hours watching television.”

Beyond the impact of Social TV, the study also revealed who these Social TV participants are and why they partake. iModerate found three different types of “Social TV Gurus”: The Spots Nut, The Extrovert and The Girlfriend.

The Sports Nut is a 25-54 year old male who partakes in Social TV primarily for “big games”. He posts more than 5 times a week on Social Media and enjoys debating sports, razzing buddies, celebrating and venting about teams’ successes and failures, and showing off his knowledge of sports.

The Extrovert is an 18-34 year old male who has a vast network of virtual and personal friends all over the world. He makes new friends online through chat rooms and via posting about Social TV and considers online social network connections “real” friends, even if they don’t actually “know each other”.

The Girlfriend is a 25-44 year old female who mainly engages in Social TV while watching dramas and reality shows. She relates deeply to her favorite shows and looks forward to the “girls’ night out” aspect of interacting with them through Social TV.

The study also found that beyond giving feedback and supporting their shows, the other main reasons individuals engage in Social TV are to be relevant and recognized, be part of a community, maintain relationships, and have virtual “hang out time” with friends.

About this research
The full Social TV report which includes additional findings is available as a free download from iModerate. The week of February 6th, 2012, 150 respondents completed an online quantitative study and 40 individuals participated in one-on-one conversations online. Respondents included both males and females age 18+ who spent at least one hour per week watching television and typically comment or post about programming at least once a week.

About iModerate Research Technologies
iModerate Research Technologies is a leading qualitative market research firm with a distinct approach to uncovering the most meaningful insights. Based in Denver, Colorado and founded in 2004, iModerate is known for pioneering and championing the online one-on-one. With over 100,000 conversations to our credit, and an in-depth knowledge of how consumers think and behave, we have helped countless organizations obtain the insights that matter most to them. For more information please visit http://184.72.72.106

Media Contact
Adam Rossow [email protected] Phone: 303.928.8406

 

iModerate Author

iModerate allowed us to not only connect with this hard-to-reach audience but to get a deeper understanding of their feelings on the subject of public service. iModerate promised at the outset to expand and clarify the quantitative findings in a way traditional online survey research has previously been unable to, and they delivered on this claim. As a result, we were able to expose the emotions shaping the perceptions of the class of 9/11.

Marc Porter Magee, Partnership for Public Service