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How can you get a more complete view of your consumers? Hybrid research.

How can you get a more complete view of your consumers? Hybrid research.

iModerate

Jan 30, 2017

As brands engage in a never-ending battle for share of mind and wallet, every new piece of insight has the potential to provide a competitive advantage. As we explore in our latest white paper, the companies that win are those that have a 360-degree view of their consumer and their competitors – and there is no better way to gain a more complete view than by blending research methods in a hybrid approach.

What exactly do we mean by hybrid research? In its simplest form, hybrid research simply means mixing methods.  Most commonly it involves adding a qualitative element to the end of a quantitative survey. With all the tools available today, this can mean online one-on-one chats or webcam interviews after a survey to explore certain ideas or capture feedback in the consumer’s own words. It can mean blending in-person research with online journaling, or in-home usage testing with social media.  Really, the possibilities are endless based upon your specific objectives.

Whatever blend of approaches are selected, the goal should always be the same – to give the insights some flavor, add some nuance, capture that coveted voice of the customer. Hybrid research provides this critical layer of humanity, the “why” behind the what, and it has the power to do so without derailing timelines and budgets.

To read more about hybrid research approaches, and how they can provide the most comprehensive perspective on your consumers, check out our white paper Today’s Hybrid Research: It Might Not Mean What You Think It Means. In it, you’ll also find examples and case studies from brands that have used mixed methodologies successfully.

iModerate allowed us to not only connect with this hard-to-reach audience but to get a deeper understanding of their feelings on the subject of public service. iModerate promised at the outset to expand and clarify the quantitative findings in a way traditional online survey research has previously been unable to, and they delivered on this claim. As a result, we were able to expose the emotions shaping the perceptions of the class of 9/11.

Marc Porter Magee, Partnership for Public Service