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Are these new logos super or sucky?

Are these new logos super or sucky?

Becky Sarniak

Aug 06, 2014

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A brand may choose to change their logo for many reasons. In 2011, Starbucks changed their logo so that their name and “coffee” was no longer contained within their logo, a reflection of Starbucks’ efforts to move beyond coffee. Olive Garden recently changed their logo as part of a “brand renaissance.” With the controversy surrounding the name of the Washington Redskins, is a logo change imminent?

A logo can instantly identify a brand and evoke a whole range of consumer thoughts, memories and emotions. When my nephew was 3 years old (before he could read), he could point out the names of restaurants we passed based on the logos… even restaurants he had never visited before, indicating the power of a recognizable logo. So how does a logo change impact consumer loyalty, perception and consumer preferences?  Those are great questions, but we’ll save them for another blog post. Today, we are just interested in figuring out which of the following new logos work, who did it best, and who should have just left well enough alone. Cast your votes now! [socialpoll id=”2152587″ type=”set”][socialpoll id=”2214437″][socialpoll id=”2214438″]

Becky Sarniak

Manager, Moderating Services

What I love about research is learning about people and what they think. Discovering the reasoning behind behavior and what motivates people to move from a plan of action to action itself.

The results we received from the iModerate one-on-one, in-depth conversations were much more enlightening than what we typically garner from open-ended verbatim responses. The live moderator offers us the ability and flexibility to probe deeper on certain points, enabling us to get stronger, less vague information. That unique capability has proved extremely valuable to us, and has made this IM-based platform an integral part of our research toolbox.

Colleen Hepner, VP, C&R Research