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Real-Time Analysis is Just One Piece of the Puzzle

Real-Time Analysis is Just One Piece of the Puzzle

iModerate Author

Mar 13, 2011

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Our “need it now” culture is having an impact on market research, and our deliverables need to seek refuge. Real-time analysis is sweeping the industry, but when it comes to digging into qualitative feedback and producing a substantial document that tells the story, sometimes we just need to take it slow.

Understandably, clients desire analysis from their qualitative research fast, VERY fast. This has led to the creation of “real-time” analysis tools and approaches such as text analytics, immediate post-project debriefs, single snippets of customer video, etc… While these deliverables do have value, I believe that in the end, analyzing qualitative research calls for a holistic, comprehensive process.

I’m a big fan of puzzles. So let’s use them as an example of a research project. If you only have a few pieces of the puzzle, it’s impossible to get the complete picture (unless of course you look at the box). While a few pieces can give you some idea as to where everything is headed and direction on how to get there, getting to your end goal still requires putting all the pieces together.

The same can be said for putting together a complete insight picture. Real-time analysis is only a single piece, and much is lost when we forgo the process of analysts carefully scrutinizing the consumer feedback and meshing unique ideas and thoughts together. The final deliverables should be an amalgamation of each piece.

So while we all want our qualitative insights at mock speed, I encourage us to pump the brakes when it comes to the deliverables. If we don’t, we are only getting a piece of the puzzle and failing to get everything possible from the project.

iModerate Author

iModerate allowed us to not only connect with this hard-to-reach audience but to get a deeper understanding of their feelings on the subject of public service. iModerate promised at the outset to expand and clarify the quantitative findings in a way traditional online survey research has previously been unable to, and they delivered on this claim. As a result, we were able to expose the emotions shaping the perceptions of the class of 9/11.

Marc Porter Magee, Partnership for Public Service